We will be closed to the public from July 18 to mid-August while we move to our new location and get everything ready to reopen to the public! Please be aware that any online orders made during that period will not be shipped until the middle of August.

"North America's Maritime Museums: An Annotated Guide" (used book)

"North America's Maritime Museums: An Annotated Guide" (used book)

Regular price $20.00 Sale

North America's Maritime Museums: An Annotated Guide

by Hartley Edward Howe

 

About the Book

Used Book. Hardcover. Dust jacket included. Good condition.

-- From the dust jacket

From Connecticut’s Mystic Seaport to the National Maritime Museum on San Francisco’s Embarcadero, visitors are rediscovering their centuries-old maritime heritage in ships that have survived the great age of sail along with artifacts and mementos of the men who sailed them, and the logs that record and the pictures that celebrate their history.

The number of places of interest to shiplovers has multiplied along our ocean coasts, inland seas, and great rivers. Today there are more survivors of our maritime past preserved and accessible than ever before. Dedicated enthusiasts, and a striking growth in public interest in recent decades, have opened not only maritime museums but also ships of the past, both sail and steam, that can be visited throughout the United States and Canada.

But multiplication of sites has not been matched by the availability of information about them. The would-be visitor may have real difficulty in learning about a good many of them – or, in some cases, in becoming aware that they exist. Some of the most interesting sites are little-known even there. To plan visits to such places requires poking through a raft of hard-to-find local and state guidebooks, writing tours agencies, and often, in the end, depending on the lucky guess of a local gas station attendant.

North America’s Maritime Museums remedies this confusion by telling what ships and museums can be visited – and where. The guide is inclusive rather than selective, designed for the average traveler rather than the student with sharply focused historical queries. The entries are not concerned with critical analyses or collection inventories; rather they try to tell enough about each place so the traveler can decide whether he or she would like to visit.