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"The Chartmakers: The History of Nautical Surveying in Canada" (used book)

"The Chartmakers: The History of Nautical Surveying in Canada" (used book)

Regular price $10.00 Sale

The Chartmakers: The History of Nautical Surveying in Canada

by Stanley Fillmore and R.W. Sandilands

 

About the Book

Used Book. Hardcover. Dust jacket included. Fair condition. Stain on top exterior of pages.

-- From the dust jacket

Canada’s first chartmakers were the early explorers who sailed our waters in search of new lands and sea routes. The charts of such explorers as Champlain, Cook, Vancouver and Franklin were no only crucial to their survival but helped to establish claims of sovereignty for England and France.

The charting of Canada’s three oceans and thousands of miles of inland waterways by Canadian hydrographers is now 100 years old and this book is published in celebration of this anniversary.

Many years in the making, The Chartmakers, was created by R.W. (Sandy) Sandilands, who painstakingly documented the early yars of the Canadian Hydrographic Service; Stanley Fillmore who provided researched [sic] of the surveys of Canada’s early explorers and provided the text, and Michael Foster who created a stunning visual record of modern chartmaking.

Nautical surveying remains as formidable today as it was in earlier centuries, and in some cases, equally dangerous. The reader is taken to the desolate ice-covered waters of Fury and Hecla Strait in the Arctic, a pleasure boater’s paradise off Vancouver Island, the blue expanse of the Arctic’s Beaufort Sea and the frozen reaches of Little Cornwallis Island, down to Trinity Bay off Newfoundland’s coast and into the Great Lakes at Kingston and to Lac St. Jean in Quebec.